Jihadi Terrorism and the Radicalisation Challenge: European and American Experiences

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To conclude I will examine the role of neo-conservative think-tanks that have sought to develop counter-subversion strategies against politically active Muslims in the UK. Most asylum seekers spend many years in a punitive direct provision system composed of fifty privatised and semi-privatised shadow villages. Officially, this system is understood to be a deterrent to certain forms of migration.

Integration, therefore, is only for those with refugee or subsidiary protection status. In this paper, however, I offer different perspectives — indeed, this paper is about alternative views, alternative ways of exploring and explaining the based on ethnographic data.

Jihadi Terrorism and the Radicalisation Challenge

I draw on several different projects and from the recent theoretical contributions by Wendy Brown and Veena Das in order to open out new ways of thinking about the relationships between governing and subjects. I draw on several years of ethnographic and policy research among asylum seekers to everyday lives situated against racialising myths, security discourse and surprisingly ad hoc neo-liberal governmentality.

Nowadays, we are witnessing new ways in how issues of borders and mobilities are studied.

In this work we address one particular border shift. Of specific interest for present purposes is the juxtaposition of the external and internal EU borders in relation to mobility.

The suggested framework points to the emergence of a border shift paradigm when considering EU borders, which actively seeks to contain mobility and the restrictions to it. Such a paradigm is theorised as a simultaneous impact of external Ribas-Mateos and internal borders thus, drawing on multiple examples, singling out, through my own research as well as through numerous debates, one key idea that seems to be reflected is that there is a complex form of deterritorialisation that can guide future debates, where the new role of the Nation-state reproduces old roles and new roles of administrative forms, including categories and sub-categories of classifying mobilities and populations.

Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Osama bin Laden's demise in May marked only the symbolic end of an era. By the time of his killing, he no longer represented the Robin Hood icon that once stirred global fascination.

Ten years after the 11 September attacks, jihadi terrorism has largely lost its juggernaut luster. It now mostly resembles a patchwork of self-radicalising local groups with internat Osama bin Laden's demise in May marked only the symbolic end of an era. It now mostly resembles a patchwork of self-radicalising local groups with international contacts but without any central organisational design - akin to the radical left terrorism of the s and the anarchist fin-de-siecle terrorism.

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Jihadi terrorism and the radicalisation challenge: European and American experiences

This volume addresses two issues that remain largely unexplored in contemporary terrorism studies. It rehabilitates the historical and comparative analysis as a way to grasp the essence of terrorism, including its jihadi strand. Crucial similarities with earlier forms of radicalisation and terrorism abound and differences appear generally not fundamental. Likewise, the very concept of radicalisation is seldom questioned anymore. Nevertheless it often lacks conceptual clarity and empirical validation.

Once considered a quintessential European phenomenon, the United States too experiences how some of its own citizens radicalise into terrorist violence. This collective work compares radicalisation in both continents and the strategies aimed at de-radicalisation. But it also assesses if the concept merits its reputation as the holy grail of terrorism studies. The volume is aimed at an audience of decision makers, law enforcement officials, academia and think tanks, by its combination of novel thinking, practical experience and a theoretical approach.

In previous decades, the average age was 28 years and the typical age range 25— Nowadays however, it is more likely to be close to 20, and the age range of the foreign fighters from Belgium seems to be typically 20— Unfortunately, teenagers are no exceptions, and neither are entire families, and mothers with small children travelling to Syria.


  • The Muslim Brotherhood in Europe.
  • Why We Hate Politics (Short Introductions);
  • Day by Day;

The suddenness of their decision to leave for Syria is also a striking characteristic for most of the youngsters. Geopolitics is less important to them than to their predecessors, who felt motivated by the struggle against the superpowers. Now, personal estrangement has become the primary engine. Once in Syria and Iraq, their yearning to place themselves at the centre of events with numerous selfies and social media posts on trivia like kohl makeup for boys and other teenage themes reflects a degree of narcissism that was largely absent among their older predecessors.

It is fair to characterize the current foreign fighters phenomenon as part of a youth subculture that has developed against a very specific social and international context. Moreover, it is a generational conflict.

The Muslim Brotherhood in Europe | Hurst Publishers

To begin with the most obvious transformation, society today puts much greater pressure on young people than it did 40 years ago. Individualism and the lifting of traditional political, religious and ideological fault lines leave youngsters much earlier to their own devises and exposed to society than their peers back then. Simply put, it is more demanding to be young today than it was back then. Today, moreover, this happens in an environment that has become very complex, with fewer benchmarks and points of reference, as a result of the dynamics of globalisation and the post-industrial revolution.

Secondly, pessimism rules today.

Why ISIS attacked Brussels

All European countries have been increasingly under the spell of pessimism, according to surveys.